MYC Research Reagents

What Is MYC Protein?

MYC oncogene was originally discovered as the cellular homolog of v-myc, a retroviral oncogene from an avian myelocytomatosis virus. MYC, also called c-MYC, is a transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes controlling cell growth and proliferation. It is generally expressed in all dividing cells from embryonic and adult tissues.

What is the feature of the MYC structure?

MYC is made up of an N-terminal domain (NTD), a central region, and a C-terminal domain (CTD). Its NTD contains the transcriptional activation domain (TAD) and three "MYC boxes" 1-3, which are involved in transcription regulation and protein stability. The nuclear localization signal (NLS) lies in the central region and is associated with MYC cellular transforming activity, transcription, and apoptosis. The CTD holds the basic helix–loop–helix leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) motif that is necessary for DNA-protein interactions.

The Functions of MYC Protein

MYC plays a central role in the transcriptional regulatory network that controls the expression of about 15% of human genes involved in cell cycle regulation, cell survival, protein synthesis, cell adhesion, and cytoskeleton, differentiation, and metabolism, signal transduction, transcription, translation, and MicroRNA synthesis. It is involved in the development of tumors and the induction of apoptosis.

The MYC signaling pathway

MYC exerts its diverse functions by ligating to its obligate partner MYC-associated factor X (MAX). MYC-MAX heterodimeric complexes recognize and bind to the "Enhancer box" (E-box) motifs (5′-CACGTG-3′) in the promoters of target genes to recruit multiple interacting proteins, thus leading to transcriptional activation. These genes are involved in cell growth and proliferation.

MYC and Cancer

In the majority of normal cells, MYC activation is inhibited through multiple genetic and epigenetically controlled checkpoint mechanisms, including proliferative arrest, apoptosis, and cellular senescence, thus blocking tumorigenesis. However, MYC is deregulated in numerous human cancers by chromosomal translocations and amplification, activation of upstream growth stimulatory signaling cascades, increased protein stability, and other different mechanisms. MYC overexpression has been found in numerous human tumors and is responsible for neoplastic transformation by deregulating central cellular processes including cell cycle progression, differentiation, metabolism, and angiogenesis.

Having a good understanding of MYC's expression and function can promote cancer treatment development. Bromodomain protein-mediated MYC's activation could be repressed by drug-like molecules, thus leading to tumor suppression in vivo. Targeting MYC-MAX dimerization or MYC-induced microRNA expression could also be a potent strategy to inhibit MYC on the path to cancer.

The following MYC reagents supplied by CUSABIO are manufactured under a strict quality control system. Multiple applications have been validated and solid technical support is offered.

MYC Antibodies

MYC Antibodies for Homo sapiens (Human)

MYC Antibodies for Drosophila melanogaster (Fruit fly)

MYC Antibodies for Avian myelocytomatosis virus CMII

MYC Antibodies for Avian myelocytomatosis virus HBI

MYC Antibodies for Avian retrovirus MH2

MYC Antibodies for Avian retrovirus MH2E21

MYC Antibodies for Avian retrovirus OK10

MYC Antibodies for Feline leukemia virus

MYC Antibodies for Feline leukemia virus FTT

MYC Antibodies for Avian myelocytomatosis virus MC29

MYC Antibodies for Mus musculus (Mouse)

MYC Proteins

MYC Proteins for Felis catus (Cat) (Felis silvestris catus)

MYC Proteins for Mus musculus (Mouse)

MYC Proteins for Gallus gallus (Chicken)

MYC Proteins for Homo sapiens (Human)

MYC Proteins for Rattus norvegicus (Rat)

MYC Proteins for Macaca mulatta (Rhesus macaque)

MYC Proteins for Marmota monax (Woodchuck)

MYC Proteins for Pan troglodytes (Chimpanzee)

MYC Proteins for Callithrix jacchus (White-tufted-ear marmoset)

MYC Proteins for Hylobates lar (Common gibbon) (White-handed gibbon)

MYC Proteins for Pan paniscus (Pygmy chimpanzee) (Bonobo)

MYC Proteins for Pongo pygmaeus (Bornean orangutan)

MYC Proteins for Feline leukemia virus

MYC Proteins for Avian retrovirus MH2

MYC Proteins for Avian myelocytomatosis virus CMII

MYC Proteins for Avian retrovirus OK10

MYC Proteins for Feline leukemia virus FTT

MYC Proteins for Carassius auratus (Goldfish)

MYC Proteins for Avian myelocytomatosis virus HBI

MYC Proteins for Oncorhynchus mykiss (Rainbow trout) (Salmo gairdneri)

MYC Proteins for Avian myelocytomatosis virus MC29

MYC Proteins for Avian retrovirus MH2E21

MYC Proteins for Asterias rubens (Common European starfish) (Asterias vulgaris)

MYC Proteins for Canis lupus familiaris (Dog) (Canis familiaris)

MYC Proteins for Ovis aries (Sheep)

MYC Proteins for Sus scrofa (Pig)

MYC Proteins for Bos taurus (Bovine)

MYC Proteins for Sylvilagus floridanus (Cottontail rabbit)

MYC Proteins for Pteropus hypomelanus (Island flying fox) (Variable flying fox)

MYC Proteins for Galeopterus variegatus (Malayan flying lemur) (Cynocephalus variegatus)

MYC Proteins for Tupaia glis (Tree shrew)

MYC Proteins for Tadarida brasiliensis (Brazilian free-tailed bat)

MYC Proteins for Drosophila melanogaster (Fruit fly)

MYC ELISA Kit

MYC ELISA Kit for Homo sapiens (Human)

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